• Abbott replaced days before the election after a series of car crash interviews
  • Now said it was because she was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes two years ago
  • Abbott accused Tories of most vicious general election campaign in memory

Daniel Martin Policy Editor For The Daily Mail

Diane Abbott last night revealed she had had to step aside as shadow home secretary because she had diabetes

Diane Abbott last night revealed she had had to step aside as shadow home secretary because she had diabetes

Diane Abbott last night revealed she had had to step aside as shadow home secretary because she had diabetes

Diane Abbott last night revealed she had had to step aside as shadow home secretary because she had diabetes.

The Labour frontbencher was temporarily replaced just days before the election after a series of car crash interviews.

But yesterday she told The Guardian she had gone because she had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes two years ago.

Abbott accused the Tories of unleashing the most vicious and negative general election campaign in her memory, and expressed her disappointment that a female prime minister had singled her out as a national target.

She insisted that she was managing her condition and felt ready to return to work.

But Abbott admitted that it had affected her performance in broadcast interviews branded a ‘car crash’ in the midst of the seven-week campaign.

In one of the interviews, she was famously unable to say how much her party’s policy of employing more police would cost.

‘During the election campaign, everything went crazy – and the diabetes was out of control, the blood sugar was out of control,’ she said.

The shadow home secretary said she was badly affected after facing six or seven interviews in a row without eating enough food.

She said her brother had watched and listened to interviews, including when she stumbled over figures on a key policy on police funding when being grilled by LBC’s Nick Ferrari, and got in touch with her.

Abbott accused the Tories of unleashing the most vicious and negative general election campaign in her memory

Abbott accused the Tories of unleashing the most vicious and negative general election campaign in her memory

Abbott accused the Tories of unleashing the most vicious and negative general election campaign in her memory

Abbott said: ‘He said ‘that is not Diane’, because ever since I’ve been a child I’ve had a great memory for figures, and he said he knew it was my blood sugar and gave me a lecture about eating and having glucose tablets.

‘It is a condition you can manage. I am doing that now and I feel ready to get back to work.’

Abbott said she was touched by the thousands of messages of support she received and praised the Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn, saying that a hugely positive campaign had stripped Theresa May of her majority.

‘There was a sense in this campaign nationally that whether you were a Ukip voter concerned about immigration, or whether you were a young professional in Hackney worried about Brexit, in the end, faced with the Tory campaign, you came home,” she said.

Abbott said she was replaced by Labour days before the election because she had gone because she had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes two years ago

Abbott said she was replaced by Labour days before the election because she had gone because she had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes two years ago

Abbott said she was replaced by Labour days before the election because she had gone because she had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes two years ago

But she hit out at the relentless attacks against Corbyn, Labour and her, claiming that she felt as if she was in a “vortex” as it dawned on her that she had been chosen to be singled out for targeting by the prime minister and the Conservative’s chief strategist. ‘Clearly I was part of Lynton Crosby’s grid,” she said.

Abbott, who revealed that a number of Tory MPs had approached her since returning to parliament to express their distaste at the tone of the campaign, said the Labour party had considered legal action at one point.

‘The first time I became aware that I was a target of a national campaign was when people in marginals in the north were WhatsApping me to say there were ad vans talking about me, with a picture of me and Jeremy on,” she said.

‘Then there were these targeted Facebook ads. There was one which was a mashup ad which made it sound as if I supported al-Qaida. We did contemplate taking legal action,’ she said, adding that they decided it would only make her more of a target. 

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