• Exit poll suggests May has thrown away the Tories majority in Parliament
  • With 314 seats the Tories might be able to hold on as a minority government 
  • But every loss will make it easier for Corbyn to seize power in the coming days
  • He would be dependant on votes from the SNP and other small parties  

Tim Sculthorpe, Deputy Political Editor For Mailonline

Tonight’s stunning exit poll of the 2017 general election has thrown into chaos expectations of Britain’s future and leaves in limbo who will form the next Government. 

If correct it will mean a stunning defiance of the pundits and the polls by Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn – and place him within touching distance of No 10.

Theresa May is still the Prime Minister until she resigns and she may try to cling on and present a Queen’s Speech on June 19.

Every Tory loss will make it easier for Mr Corbyn to convince the Queen he is best able to win votes in Parliament at the head of a rainbow coalition.

A hung parliament could mean Britain is forced back to the polls for a second election within months if whatever government emerges in the coming days collapses.  

The stunning exit poll has predicted the Conservatives will end the night on 314 seats - a catastrophic loss that destroys the majority won in 2015 

The stunning exit poll has predicted the Conservatives will end the night on 314 seats - a catastrophic loss that destroys the majority won in 2015 

The stunning exit poll has predicted the Conservatives will end the night on 314 seats – a catastrophic loss that destroys the majority won in 2015 

Theresa May could have thrown away the Tory majority leaving the expectations of Britain's future in chaos 

Theresa May could have thrown away the Tory majority leaving the expectations of Britain's future in chaos 

Theresa May could have thrown away the Tory majority leaving the expectations of Britain’s future in chaos 

What did the exit poll say and is it correct?

The exit poll suggests the Conservatives have lost seats and are on track to lose their majority. If correct, it puts the Tories on 314 seats – down from 330 in 2015.

Labour meanwhile is predicted to gain seats on the exit poll – surging to 266 seats, a strong second place.

The exit poll – based on interviews with 30,450 people at 144 polling stations – has a margin of error of 20 seats, enough to put a very different picture on the results.

The early results have painted a very mixed picture – even in seats that are next door to each. The Tories gained ground in Sunderland but lost it in Newcastle.  

Will Theresa May still be the Prime Minister?

Theresa May is the Prime Minister until she goes to see the Queen to resign.

She will not do this if she wins enough seats to believe she can pass a Queen’s Speech and the next Budget. 

Every seat below an absolute majority – which means having 326 seats – makes this more difficult. 

If the Tories finish at or below 300 seats it is hard to see Mrs May surviving Friday.

As the results came in, Boris Johnson’s odds of being the next Prime Minister were slashed from 66/1 to 5/1.  

Will Jeremy Corbyn enter No 10?

The exit poll suggests Labour will be the second largest party by some distance – but he could still get into No 10.

If all the other parties promise to vote against the Tories Queen’s Speech and instead back Labour, Mr Corbyn could claim a mandate to try and form a government.

Labour has insisted it will not build a forma coalition – meaning it would have to take power as a minority government and negotiate issue by issue. 

Does this mean a second election? 

Minority government is very difficult and whoever is Prime Minister can expect to face defeats in the House of Commons.

Losing the biggest votes – on the Queen’s Speech and the Budget – usually causes a Government to collapse.

The Fixed Term Parliament Act suggests if this happen the other main party should try to form a government before a second election.

But no government can sustain repeated defeat – suggesting the country could be asked again.

Shadow foreign secretary Emily Thornberry (pictured on Sky News tonight) became the first to call for the Tory leader to resign, accusing her of 'manifestly failing'

Shadow foreign secretary Emily Thornberry (pictured on Sky News tonight) became the first to call for the Tory leader to resign, accusing her of 'manifestly failing'

Shadow foreign secretary Emily Thornberry (pictured on Sky News tonight) became the first to call for the Tory leader to resign, accusing her of ‘manifestly failing’

What does it mean for Brexit? 

This is very unclear. if Labour takes power, they have promised to scrap all of the work done so far and start again.

Labour have set out plans for a much softer Brexit than Theresa May and could be forced by the SNP to maintain membership of the single market.

Brexit talks are due to begin in 11 days time – but it is not clear if a change of government would force a delay.

Ukip leader Paul Nuttall tonight raised fears for Brexit if the results prove to be as bad for the Tories as suggested by the exit poll.  

Will there be another Tory coalition? 

The question has not emerged during an election campaign dominated by expectations of a big Tory win.

But the Liberal Democrats have already ruled out doing a coalition deal with anyone after the results are known.

This would seem to make it unlikely that Mrs May will get back into power the same way David Cameron did in 2010.  

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