Polls narrow again with May under fire for skipping debate

1 Jun

Theresa May is under fire for skipping the BBC’s ‘coalition of chaos’ election debate today amid signs the election is getting nail-bitingly close.

With just a week to go until the nation votes, Mrs May is facing mockery for refusing to take part in the seven-way debate. 

Political opponents leapt on the decision to claim that the premier was ‘complacent’ and taking the public for granted.

But Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson insisted Mrs May was right to sit it out and send Home Secretary Amber Rudd in her place – dismissing the event as a ‘great yammering cacophony’ that ‘elucidated nothing’.

Tory nerves over the increasingly tight race have been further frayed by a poll showing the party is just 3 points ahead of Labour – not enough for an overall majority.

Jeremy Corbyn tried to turn the screw on Mrs May last night by making an eleventh hour decision to turn up for the BBC debate.

However, he did not emerge unscathed – with Ms Rudd lashing the veteran left-winger over his refusal to promise lower immigration if he upsets the odds to win next week. 

She also slammed Mr Corbyn’s ‘chilling’ boast he had opposed anti-terror laws for 30 years.

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Amber Rudd tonight warned Britain it had ‘seen the coalition of chaos in action’ at a furious seven-way debate on live TV as she faced off with Jeremy Corbyn

The Home Secretary lashed Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn over his refusal to promise lower immigration if he upsets the odds to win next week

The Home Secretary lashed Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn over his refusal to promise lower immigration if he upsets the odds to win next week

The Home Secretary lashed Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn over his refusal to promise lower immigration if he upsets the odds to win next week

Boris Johnson was sent out this morning to defend the PM over her absence from the debate

Boris Johnson was sent out this morning to defend the PM over her absence from the debate

Boris Johnson was sent out this morning to defend the PM over her absence from the debate

A YouGov poll for the Times today suggested the Tory lead was down to just three points

A YouGov poll for the Times today suggested the Tory lead was down to just three points

A YouGov poll for the Times today suggested the Tory lead was down to just three points

But the Tory minister faced ridicule as she stood in for Theresa May, who swerved the debate by insisting she had better things to do than ‘swap soundbites’ on TV.

The SNP’s Nicola Sturgeon also did not feature, but Mr Corbyn made a last minute decision to turn up and used the unruly bout to try and press the case for his ‘transformation’ of Britain.

Reaction to the debate was dominated by questions over the BBC audience which despite being selected by pollster ComRes to ensure balanced appeared to heavily favour the left-wing panellists.

Ms Rudd and Ukip leader Paul Nuttall were jeered by the audience in Cambridge while Mr Corbyn, Lib Dem leader Tim Farron, Plaid’s Leanne Wood and SNP Angus Robertson won frequent applause. 

Mr Johnson today branded it the ‘most left-wing studio audience the BBC has ever brought together’ and an ‘echo chamber’ for ‘left-wing nonsense’.

The Home Secretary closed the debate with a warning to Britain not to let Mr Corbyn into No 10 at the election, which is now just eight days away.

She said: ‘You heard the squabbling and discord of disagreement tonight. You saw the coalition of chaos in action.

‘But in the quiet of the polling booth you have a clear choice. A vote for anyone other than Theresa May is a vote for Jeremy Corbyn and that coalition.

‘Our government needs to be at its strongest to take us through Brexit. It is only Theresa May that can deliver that leadership.’

Mr Corbyn did not directly attack Mrs May’s absence but said the debate showed the ‘real choice facing the country’ as he promised a tax raid on business and the rich to pay for a lavish manifesto of public spending, free tuition and nationalisation.    

Mr Farron had no such qualms about attacking the PM and suggested viewers change the channel to miss Ms Rudd’s closing remarks.  

He said: ‘The Prime Minister is not here tonight. She can’t be bothered. So why should you?’

The official House of Cards account piled in to mock Mrs May over the BBC debate row

The official House of Cards account piled in to mock Mrs May over the BBC debate row

The official House of Cards account piled in to mock Mrs May over the BBC debate row

Reaction to the debate was dominated by questions over the BBC audience which despite being selected by pollster ComRes to ensure balanced appeared to heavily favour the left-wing panellists.

Reaction to the debate was dominated by questions over the BBC audience which despite being selected by pollster ComRes to ensure balanced appeared to heavily favour the left-wing panellists.

Reaction to the debate was dominated by questions over the BBC audience which despite being selected by pollster ComRes to ensure balanced appeared to heavily favour the left-wing panellists.

Amber Rudd (left at tonight's BBC Tv debate) slammed Jeremy Corbyn's 'chilling' votes against every anti-terror law he has considered over 30 years

Amber Rudd (left at tonight's BBC Tv debate) slammed Jeremy Corbyn's 'chilling' votes against every anti-terror law he has considered over 30 years

Amber Rudd (left at tonight’s BBC Tv debate) slammed Jeremy Corbyn’s ‘chilling’ votes against every anti-terror law he has considered over 30 years

Ukip leader Paul Nuttall and the SNP's Angus Robertson clashed during tonight's debate on the BBC 

Ukip leader Paul Nuttall and the SNP's Angus Robertson clashed during tonight's debate on the BBC 

Ukip leader Paul Nuttall and the SNP’s Angus Robertson clashed during tonight’s debate on the BBC 

Tory grandee Nicholas Soames led irritation at the audience selection.

He said: ‘Theresa May absolutely right not to attend debate with typically rigged audience by BBC.’ 

Nadine Dorries, who is running for re-election in Mid Bedfordshire, said: ‘Balanced audience my backside. All the Green Party members in there?’ 

Mr Johnson said today that he thought the debate ‘validated and confirmed’ Mrs May’s decision to not feature.

‘It elucidated none of the issues, it was seven people speaking to probably the most left-wing studio audience the BBC has ever brought together,’ he said.

‘It was all the supporters of Plaid Cymru, the Liberal Democrats, the Scots Nats – when you put them together you had this incredible echo chamber for all sorts of left-wing nonsense.’

Ms Rudd, appearing days after the death of her father, took to the lectern as the Tory representative during the debate.

Pressed on what he thought of the Home Secretary’s performance, Mr Johnson said: ‘I thought Amber … did an absolutely heroic job of trying to injection some common sense.

‘On the key points with Jeremy Corbyn she landed some powerful blows, and she made it absolutely clear that he has no plan to deal with immigration.

‘Immigration, as she pointed out, would go up under Jeremy Corbyn; secondly, she said he was addicted to a magic money tree.’

Ukip deputy leader Peter Whittle claimed the bias in the audience was ‘beyond the joke’.

Tory grandee Nicholas Soames led irritation at the audience selection as he claimed the gathering was 'rigged' 

Tory grandee Nicholas Soames led irritation at the audience selection as he claimed the gathering was 'rigged' 

Tory grandee Nicholas Soames led irritation at the audience selection as he claimed the gathering was ‘rigged’ 

Nadine Dorries, who is running for re-election in Mid Bedfordshire, said: 'Balanced audience my backside. All the Green Party members in there?'

Nadine Dorries, who is running for re-election in Mid Bedfordshire, said: 'Balanced audience my backside. All the Green Party members in there?'

Nadine Dorries, who is running for re-election in Mid Bedfordshire, said: ‘Balanced audience my backside. All the Green Party members in there?’

Ukip deputy leader Peter Whittle claimed the bias in the audience was 'beyond the joke'.

Ukip deputy leader Peter Whittle claimed the bias in the audience was 'beyond the joke'.

Ukip deputy leader Peter Whittle claimed the bias in the audience was ‘beyond the joke’.

During the debate, Ms Rudd slammed Jeremy Corbyn’s ‘chilling’ votes against every anti-terror law he has considered over 30 years.

The Tory Home Secretary revealed she spends two hours every day reviewing warrants sought by the security services as she outlined the ‘severe’ terror threat to Britain.

RUDD UNDER FIRE ON ‘DEMENTIA TAX’ AND PENSIONS 

Amber Rudd was slammed by her opponents tonight over Tory plans for social care and the planned end to the triple lock.

SNP Westminster leader Angus Robertson began the attack on Ms Rudd over pensioner benefits telling her ‘I think those people deserve to know by how much’ they will lose out.

‘The Prime Minister didn’t have the guts to come along this evening to tell us,’ he said.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn and Lib Dem chief piled in behind the attack.  

The Tories have vowed to means-test the winter fuel payment, but have not set out how many older people would continue to receive the benefit, worth up to £300.

The Conservatives have also said they will consult on a cap on social care costs, but will not reveal further details until after the General Election.

Ms Rudd said the plans would mean winter fuel payments will not be paid to millionaires but would not give specific figures.

She added: ‘We will always look after pensioners, ensuring they have dignity and security in retirement.’ 

And amid a heated live TV debate a week ahead of the election, she said: ‘I am shocked that Jeremy Corbyn in 2011 boasted that he had opposed every piece of anti-terror legislation in 30 years.

‘I find it chilling.’

The Labour leader defended his record and insisted he wanted Britain kept safe.

He said: ‘My opposition to anti terror legislation is not opposition to protecting us from terrorism – it’s saying there must be judicial oversight over what is done in our name.’

Ms Rudd refused to apologise for defending the UK and vowed to ensure armed forces and security services were properly funded.

On tackling extremism, Ms Wood said cuts to the numbers of youth workers had made Britain ‘less safe’ as there were fewer people to challenge extremism in young people.

Mr Nuttall said radical Islam was ‘a cancer that needed to be cut out’ to prevent other attacks.

Asked whether he would lock up suspected terrorists without trial, he said: ‘I’ve said nothing should be taken off the table.

‘As far as I’m concerned, when MI5 tell us there are 23,000 jihadis out there who want to do us harm, I will always put British lives over the human rights of any jihadi any day.’

He was attacked for ‘going straight for Muslims’ by Mr Robertson, who prompted applause when he pointed out that a white neo-Nazi was responsible for the murder of MP Jo Cox.

Mr Corbyn said he ‘utterly deplored’ the language Mr Nuttall used, to which the Ukip leader retorted: ‘You invited Hamas to the House of Commons.’ 

Jeremy Corbyn repeatedly refused to promise immigration would be lower if he wins power at tonight's TV debate.

Jeremy Corbyn repeatedly refused to promise immigration would be lower if he wins power at tonight's TV debate.

Jeremy Corbyn repeatedly refused to promise immigration would be lower if he wins power at tonight’s TV debate.

Green leader Caroline Lucas (left) and Plaid Cymru leader Leanne Wood (right) urged voters to set aside the mainstream parties on June 8 

Green leader Caroline Lucas (left) and Plaid Cymru leader Leanne Wood (right) urged voters to set aside the mainstream parties on June 8 

Green leader Caroline Lucas (left) and Plaid Cymru leader Leanne Wood (right) urged voters to set aside the mainstream parties on June 8 

Jumping... for joy? Lib Dem leader Tim Farron leaps from the stage in the moments after filming finished

Jumping... for joy? Lib Dem leader Tim Farron leaps from the stage in the moments after filming finished

Jumping… for joy? Lib Dem leader Tim Farron leaps from the stage in the moments after filming finished

Earlier, Mr Corbyn repeatedly refused to promise immigration would be lower if he wins power at tonight’s TV debate.

The Labour leader faced a series of demands from Home Secretary Amber Rudd to say if new arrivals to Britain would fall as he outlined his policies.

Mr Corbyn ignored her shouts as he set out a ‘fair’ system that prioritised the needs of the economy and recruitment into public services over cutting numbers.

He insisted: ‘Fair is where you bring people in when they have got jobs to come to or it is necessary for them to be working here or we need them to assist in the economy. That is fair.’

Mr Farron accused the Conservatives of running an immigration policy to ‘appease Ukip’, and drew applause when he highlighted the case of an Asian doctor who was spat at and abused as he returned home after treating the injured in the Manchester bomb attack.

‘That is what happens if you demonise immigrants,’ he said.

‘Do we need, as I’m afraid the Prime Minister has done for the last seven years, to set completely barmy, bogus targets that she fails to meet every year. No we don’t.’ 

Mr Nuttall said current levels were ‘unsustainable’ and that Ukip would take action to bring the numbers coming into the country under control.

‘We would do it by having an Australian-style points system so that if you’ve got the skills this country needs, yes, please come here and work, but beyond that we have to get the population under control,’ he said.

Ukip leader Paul Nuttall was accused of using ‘hate filled rhetoric’ and ‘lying’ after he demanded an immediate halt to new arrivals. 

The politicians on stage  with host Mishal Hussein tonight are (from left) Lib Dem leader Tim Farron, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, Caroline Lucas for the Greens, Leanne Wood for Plaid Cymru, Tory Home Secretary Amber Rudd, Ukip chief Paul Nuttall, and the SNP's leader at Westminster Angus Robertson

The politicians on stage  with host Mishal Hussein tonight are (from left) Lib Dem leader Tim Farron, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, Caroline Lucas for the Greens, Leanne Wood for Plaid Cymru, Tory Home Secretary Amber Rudd, Ukip chief Paul Nuttall, and the SNP's leader at Westminster Angus Robertson

The politicians on stage  with host Mishal Hussein tonight are (from left) Lib Dem leader Tim Farron, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, Caroline Lucas for the Greens, Leanne Wood for Plaid Cymru, Tory Home Secretary Amber Rudd, Ukip chief Paul Nuttall, and the SNP’s leader at Westminster Angus Robertson

Home Secretary Amber Rudd accused Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn of believing in a 'magic money tree' at tonight's BBC debate 

Home Secretary Amber Rudd accused Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn of believing in a 'magic money tree' at tonight's BBC debate 

Home Secretary Amber Rudd accused Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn of believing in a ‘magic money tree’ at tonight’s BBC debate 

As the debate began Home Secretary Ms Rudd went straight on the attack to blast Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn for believing in a ‘magic money tree’.

Mr Corbyn won applause from the audience for demanding to know if Ms Rudd had visited a food bank or seen homeless people sleeping in Britain’s train stations.  

NEVER PLAYED THE GAME? RUDD MAKES BIZARRE MONOPOLY ATTACK ON LABOUR

Amber Rudd gave a bizarre account of the Monopoly rules tonight in an attempt to slam Jeremy Corbyn’s spending plans.

The Home Secretary suggested the game involved different coloured money for different sorts of property.

Launching a furious attack in the live TV debate, Ms Rudd: ‘It’s as though he thinks it’s some sort of game – a game of Monopoly perhaps where you ask the banker for the red money to pay electrics, the green money to buy the railways and the yellow money to buy the gasworks.

‘It’s not like that. This is people’s hard-earned money. We will protect that. We won’t roll the dice.’

The game involves coloured properties and different denominations of cash. 

In his opening speech Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron jibed that voters should peer out the window to look for Mrs May, quipping ‘she might be out there sizing up your house to pay for your social care’.

SNP Westminster leader Angus Robertson insisted his party was the only one who could stand up for Scotland.

Mrs May earlier dismissed claims she was running scared of her opponents today as a huge anti-Tory crowd gathered outside a TV showdown featuring other party leaders.

The Prime Minister insisted she was focused on talking to voters instead of ‘swapping soundbites’ on TV. 

But Mrs May’s absence was conspicuous at tonight’s BBC’s clash, which is set to feature Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn after a last-minute decision to take part.

Lib Dem leader Tim Farron, Ukip chief Paul Nuttall, Caroline Lucas for the Greens, Leanne Wood for Plaid Cymru, and the SNP’s leader at Westminster Angus Robertson will all be on stage. 

Mr Corbyn had previously insisted he would only attend alongside his main rival but was persuaded to contest the TV bout after winning good reviews for Monday night’s leaders’ programme. 

A large crowd of anti-Tory demonstrators gathered outside the BBC venue in Cambridge ahead of this evening’s debate

The protestors greeted the seven senior politicians as they arrived for the debate in Cambridge 

The Tories will be represented by Home Secretary Amber Rudd during the 90-minute debate.

The Tories will be represented by Home Secretary Amber Rudd during the 90-minute debate.

The Tories will be represented by Home Secretary Amber Rudd during the 90-minute debate.

As the debate began, Ms Rudd insisted the other parties would offer ‘bluster’ and ‘shiny promises’ but offer few answers on Brexit.

Mr Corbyn insisted he would ‘transform Britain for the many not the few’. 

Ahead of the debate, Mr Corbyn today refused to rule out doing a deal with SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon to become PM if there is no clear winner in the election.

Pressed on whether he would forge an alliance with the SNP and the Lib Dems to win the keys to Downing Street, the Labour leader said: ‘You’d better ask me that on June 9.’

The comments will fuel fears that failure by Theresa May to secure outright victory next week could open the door to a ‘coalition of chaos’.

Mr Corbyn has already said that in No10 he would ‘open discussions’ with Miss Sturgeon about her demand for a fresh independence referendum.  

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn (pictured arriving at the debate in Cambridge tonight) made a last minute decision to take part in tonight's TV clash, which Theresa May is missing

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn (pictured arriving at the debate in Cambridge tonight) made a last minute decision to take part in tonight's TV clash, which Theresa May is missing

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn (pictured arriving at the debate in Cambridge tonight) made a last minute decision to take part in tonight’s TV clash, which Theresa May is missing

SNP Westminster leader Angus Robertson and Green leader Caroline Lucas both arrived for tonight’s debate in Cambridge 

Plaid Cymru leader Leanne Wood (centre tonight) is also taking part in the 90 minute BBC clash 

Plaid Cymru leader Leanne Wood (centre tonight) is also taking part in the 90 minute BBC clash 

Plaid Cymru leader Leanne Wood (centre tonight) is also taking part in the 90 minute BBC clash 

Lib Dem leader Tim Farron (left) and Ukip chief Paul Nuttall (right) are also taking part in tonight’s contest 

Announcing his decision, Mr Corbyn said: ‘I will be taking part in tonight’s debate because I believe we must give people the chance to hear and engage with the leaders of the main parties before they vote.

‘I have never been afraid of a debate in my life. Labour’s campaign has been about taking our polices to people across the country and listening to the concerns of voters.

‘The Tories have been conducting a stage-managed arms-length campaign and have treated the public with contempt. 

‘Refusing to join me in Cambridge tonight would be another sign of Theresa May’s weakness, not strength.’ 

TWITTER MOCKS THE PM FOR NOT SHOWING UP 

Theresa May was mocked by the other party leaders tonight for her failure to attend the BBC debate. 

She insisted she was taking questions from voters around the country instead of ‘squabbling’ in the live debate.

It came after Jeremy Corbyn made a surprise announcement that he planned to take part earlier today.

Mrs May’s no-show dominated much of the debate with Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron saying in his closing statement: ‘Amber Rudd is not Prime Minister. Theresa May is not here tonight, she can’t be bothered, so why should you? In fact Bake Off is on BBC2 next, so why not make yourself a brew? You are not worth the Prime Minister’s time, so don’t give her yours.’

Plaid Cymru leader Leanne Wood rounded on Mrs May and said she was not there because ‘her campaign of soundbites is falling apart.’

SNP deputy leader Angus Robertson accused Mrs May of not having the ‘guts’ to attend the debate.

Mrs May was also mocked mercilessly on Twitter with the hashtag ‘where is Theresa’ and ‘where is May’ trending on social media and a series of memes (pictured below) being made about her failure to attend.

The Prime Minister refused to take part in head-to-head debates with any other party leaders during the campaign for the June 8 election.

The Labour leader and the PM both appeared on a Channel 4 / Sky debate last Friday – but they were interviewed separately and never appeared on stage together.

Mr Corbyn’s decision comes after he used a campaign even in central London to challenge the PM to debate him head to head on TV.

The Labour leader said it was ‘ridiculous’ that the PM is refusing to debate him directly on the same stage.

He said: ‘How ridiculous is that?

Theresa May, pictured out on the campaign trail today in Somerset, has refused to take part in nay live head to head with other party leaders 

Theresa May, pictured out on the campaign trail today in Somerset, has refused to take part in nay live head to head with other party leaders 

Theresa May, pictured out on the campaign trail today in Somerset, has refused to take part in nay live head to head with other party leaders 

The Tories have raised fears that Mr Corbyn could make significant concessions to Nicola Sturgeon (pictured campaigning in Anstruther today) to become PM if there is a hung parliament

The Tories have raised fears that Mr Corbyn could make significant concessions to Nicola Sturgeon (pictured campaigning in Anstruther today) to become PM if there is a hung parliament

The Tories have raised fears that Mr Corbyn could make significant concessions to Nicola Sturgeon (pictured campaigning in Anstruther today) to become PM if there is a hung parliament

‘Come on, Prime Minister, come and have a chat, come and have a debate. I can be ever so polite, but there are a number of questions I want to put to you.’ 

His decision piles pressure on the PM to follow suit and appear on the show.

Bookmakers Ladbrokes have shortened the odds of Mrs May taking part from 10/1 to 3/1, although she is still odds-on to stick with her boycott.

But out campaigning in Bath today, Mrs May said: ‘I think debates where the politicians are squabbling among themselves doesn’t do anything for the process of electioneering. 

FALKLANDS VETERANS VOICE ‘HORROR’ AT IDEA OF PM CORBYN

Falklands veterans have voiced ‘horror’ at the prospect of Jeremy Corbyn becoming PM after he said reclaiming the islands from Argentina by force was wrong. 

Major-General Julian Thompson, who led British forces to victory in 1982, raised fears that the Labour leader could do ‘some deal’ with Buenos Aires over the territory.

Simon Weston, the Welsh Guardsman who suffered terrible burns when his ship was bombed by Argentine jets, branded Mr Corbyn’s stance ‘crassly stupid’.

In a TV election programme earlier this week, the veteran left-winger accused Margaret Thatcher of making a ‘great deal’ of Argentina’s invasion.

Pressed on his previous description of the war as a ‘Tory plot’ and ‘flag-waving nonsense’, Mr Corbyn made clear he believed it should have been resolved through the UN – even though that was regarded as diplomatically impossible.

‘What I wanted was a stopping of that war.’

Asked whether he thought the UK should not have protected the Falklands, the Labour leader said: ‘I don’t think they should have gone in there but I also think there should have been an opportunity to stop that war happening.’

‘I think it’s about getting out and about, meeting voters and hearing directly from voters.’ 

She insisted she had been taking on Mr Corbyn ‘week in week out’ at PMQs.

‘Public scrutiny is for an election campaign. That’s why taking questions from members of the public who are going to be voting on 8 June is so important,’ the PM said. 

‘That’s what I enjoy doing during the campaigns. And I think that’s really important. That is why I’ve been doing that up and down the country. 

In an interview with ITV this afternoon, Mr Corbyn was repeatedly challenged on how he would respond if there was a hung parliament.

Initially he insisted Labour was ‘fighting to win this election’.

But asked for a third time Mr Corbyn said: ‘Well, you’d better ask me that on June 9.’

Mr Corbyn has cancelled planned appearances at stump events in Swindon and Stroud tonight, and a rally in Bristol.

The events will go ahead with shadow education secretary Angela Rayner and shadow health secretary Jon Ashworth filling in, a Labour source said.

The PM and Mr Corbyn both boycotted the first televised leaders election debate of the campaign, held on ITV earlier this month.

The show was widely mocked and branded a borefest by viewers, who pointed out that no one taking part stood a chance of leading a government after June 8.

It was most notable for Ukip leader Paul Nuttall repeatedly calling Plaid leader Leanne Wood ‘Natalie’. 

Conservative Party Chairman Patrick McLoughlin said: ‘Jeremy Corbyn has made clear that he will do a deal in order to get the keys to Downing Street.

‘Corbyn propped up by the Lib Dems and the SNP in a coalition of chaos would be a disaster for Britain and would mean a bad Brexit deal, higher taxes, more borrowing and weaker defences.

‘If you don’t think Jeremy Corbyn is fit to be Prime Minister, if you don’t think he’s up to negotiating Brexit, if you oppose a second referendum – vote for Theresa May and her Conservative team.’ 

Just five leaders went head to head in the ITV televised debate earlier this month. The show was mocked and branded a borefest by viewers who were quick to point out that none of the leaders involved in it stood any chance of leading a government after June 8

Just five leaders went head to head in the ITV televised debate earlier this month. The show was mocked and branded a borefest by viewers who were quick to point out that none of the leaders involved in it stood any chance of leading a government after June 8

Just five leaders went head to head in the ITV televised debate earlier this month. The show was mocked and branded a borefest by viewers who were quick to point out that none of the leaders involved in it stood any chance of leading a government after June 8

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