• Party leaders have written to Jeremy Corbyn and Tim Farron offering a deal
  • The Greens have reportedly offered not to field a candidate in a seat in Devon 
  • Tory MP Sarah Wollaston slams the proposal as undemocratic
  • Labour has insisted it does not want to do any backroom deals
  • The Greens have kicked off their election campaign at a rally in Bristol

Kate Ferguson, Political Correspondent For Mailonline

The Greens have offered to not put up candidates in some areas to give Labour and the Liberal Democrats a clear run at beating the Tories.

The election pact offer comes as the party kicked off its General Election campaign by promising to fight against an ‘extreme Brexit‘.

The party’s leaders¸ Caroline Lucas and Jonathan Bartley, have written to Jeremy Corbyn and Tim Farron offering the deal.

The Green Party's Molly Scott Cato, pictured at their election launch in Bristol, said the party wants to have an election pact with Labour and the Liberal Democrats

The Green Party's Molly Scott Cato, pictured at their election launch in Bristol, said the party wants to have an election pact with Labour and the Liberal Democrats

The Green Party’s Molly Scott Cato, pictured at their election launch in Bristol, said the party wants to have an election pact with Labour and the Liberal Democrats

Green MEP Molly Scott Cato urged the parties to sign up to the pact ‘to move beyond the tribal politics of the past and cooperate for the sake of the country’.

She told the BBC Radio 4 Today Programme: ‘We’re waiting to hear what the response is.’

Caroline Lucas, pictured as the Green Party's election launch, has written to Jeremy Corbyn and Tim Farron offering a deal

Caroline Lucas, pictured as the Green Party's election launch, has written to Jeremy Corbyn and Tim Farron offering a deal

Caroline Lucas, pictured as the Green Party’s election launch, has written to Jeremy Corbyn and Tim Farron offering a deal

She added: ‘It’s important to set the discussions in context. The reason we’re talking about this is that, like a lot of progressives, we’re very concerned about the direction the Tories are taking the country.

‘I think they’re using Brexit as an opportunity to move us to the right.

‘Theresa May has given us an opportunity (by calling the snap General Eection) … but to use that opportunity we need to cooperate as parties of opposition who don’t want that Tory future.’

The Greens have said they are willing to stand aside in the Devon seat of Plymouth Sutton and Devonport to give Labour a better chance of beating theTory MP Oliver Colville, according to the BBC.

In return it wants Labour to agree not to field a candidate in the nearby seat of Totnes.

But Tory Totnes MP Sarah Wollaston hit out at the plans, which she said are, ‘anti-democratic’.

And Labour rebuffed the offer, insisting ‘people don’t want backroom deals’.

 A party spokesman said: ‘They want to vote for a party they’ve got confidence in. There’s only one alternative government and that’s Labour. 

‘The only way to get the change we need, to build a fair economy and strong public services is to vote Labour.’ 

Meanwhile, the party promised to put young people at the heart of its policies as it launched its General Election campaign in Bristol.

And the party vowed to campaign against the ‘extreme Brexit and far-right Conservative agenda’ – describing itself as the ‘antidote to Ukip’.

It is campaigning for free education and the scrapping of university tuition fees, a living wage for all and investment in mental health services.

The party is also calling for votes at 16 so 16 and 17-year-olds can have their say on June 8.

Ms Scott Cato told supporters: ‘I am clear that this election is the most significant of my lifetime. We truly are at a crossroads for Britain’s future.

Green Party supporters gathered in Bristol where they kicked off their election campaign 

Green Party supporters gathered in Bristol where they kicked off their election campaign 

Green Party supporters gathered in Bristol where they kicked off their election campaign 

The Greens described themselves as the antidote to Ukip and vowed to fight an extreme Brexit

The Greens described themselves as the antidote to Ukip and vowed to fight an extreme Brexit

The Greens described themselves as the antidote to Ukip and vowed to fight an extreme Brexit

‘Today marks the beginning of the Green Party’s campaign for a bold, positive future for our country, in wholehearted opposition to the extreme Brexit and far-right agenda threatened by another five years of Tory Government.’

Directing her comments to young people, she said: ‘It’s hard to think of a time when the young have faced a bleaker future and in this election we risk the election of a Tory Government which will make things so much worse for them.

‘They will pursue an extreme Brexit that young people didn’t want and voted against; they will dismantle public services which benefitted their parents and grandparents – from health to welfare to education; they will take away their opportunities; they’ll take away their security; they’ll take away their prosperity.’

She said the Greens will scrap tuition fees and restore the principle of free education.   

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